John Theodor Eilert Theodorsen

My maternal Norwegian second great grandfather

Birth: Apr. 20, 1841
Bergen
Bergen kommune
Hordaland fylke, Norway
Death: Nov. 8, 1920
Trondheim kommune
Sør-Trøndelag fylke, Norway 

Son of Eilert Theodor Lund and Ellen Elbertine Knudsen.
Baptized on 9 October 1842 in Domkirken (Bergen Cathedral), Bergen, Hordaland, Norway. Church of Norway (Evangelical Lutheran).
Husband of Georgine Johanne Jansen.

Married on 21 October 1870 in Domkirken (Bergen Cathedral), Bergen, Hordaland, Norway.

Children: John Macordy Lund, Gudrun Ivara Lund (Linderman), Ragnhild, Elsiff, and Solveig Lund. 

Family links:  
Children: Gudrun Ivara Lund Linderman (1881 – 1924) My maternal great grandmother.

Burial: 
Domkirkegården
Trondheim
Trondheim kommune
Sør-Trøndelag fylke, Norway

Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Sep 28, 2015
Find A Grave Memorial# 152969423

Night view from Mount Floyen, Bergen Norway

 

scandinavia

Wunderscapes Travel

In July I will be leaving for a month-long trip to Croatia and Italy, but until then I won’t have some new pictures to share.  Instead, I’ll keep posting photos from my travels last year.  Today I’ve got some more pictures from Scandinavia that I feel should be shared. Enjoy!

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Cairn on top of Vidden Plateau in Bergen, Norway

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Hiking across the Vidden Plateau in Bergen, Norway

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View of Bergen, Norway from the peak of Mt. Ulriken

Bryggen

Bryggen Wharf in Bergen, Norway

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Stockholm, Sweden

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Stockholm Archipelago

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Grinda Island, Stockholm Archipelago

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Grinda Island, Stockholm Archipelago

Copenhagen

Copenhagen, Denmark

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My Maternal Great Grandmother, Gudrun Ivara (Lund) Linderman emigrated from Namsos, Lufthavn, North Trondelag, Norway in 1896

Harry, Gladys, Gudrun (Lund) Linderman, baby Irene Linderman

Harry, Gladys, Gudrun (Lund)Linderman, & baby Irene Linderman, 1909, Dubuque, Iowa.

Namsos is a small municipality in Norway, in Nord-Trondelag County. It is in the area of Namdalen. The administrative hub of the municipality is Namsos, a small town. Some of the other small villages in the municipality are Spillum, Skomsvoll, Ramsvika, Klinga, and Bangsund. The municipality has a population of roughly 13,000, and it covers almost 300 square miles. 

Namsos is a very important trading destination in Norway, and it has a lot of recreational and cultural hotspots for tourists. In the late summer, you can go to the Namsos Country Fair, which is a shopping event for the whole Namdalen area. You can also see the Nord-Trondelag Art Gallery and the Concert Hall in the town. The gallery has permanent as well as temporary exhibitions of artists from both Norway and around the world. 

There are several different salmon fishing rivers within an hour of the town. There are even more fishing destinations up in the mountain lakes and along the coastline. If you ascend to the top of Mount Klompen, you can get a great view of the whole city of Namsos. 

There is a big outlet that sells candles of all colors, sizes, and shapes, and it is located in an old train station. 

Name 

The first half of the name comes from a local river called Namsen. The last part of ostranslates to “mouth of a river”. 

History 

In 1846, Namsos was founded at the mouth of the Namsen river in Overhalden,, in the Saevik area. It was created as a distinct municipality, with roughly 600 inhabitants, and it was distinct from Vemundvik. 

In 1865, Namso became an official parish in the Church of Norway. A formal decision was made to create a church in the city in 1859. The construction was finished in 1859. The parish was created in 1865, and Saevik and Vemundvik were sub-parishes. 

Some parts of Vemundvik near to the town of Namos were afterward integrated into the city limits on several occasions. 

The town’s location near the river and the big forests made the town a great place for sawmills. Almost a dozen sawmills were operating at their peak, but there is only one sawmill that’s still standing: Moelven Van Severen. You can also visit the Norwegian Sawmill Museum at Spillum just to the south of the town. 

Namsos has a swimming pool, called Oasen, and it was built inside of a mountain.

My Maternal Great Grandmother, Gudrun Ivara (Lund) Linderman emigrated from Namsos, Lufthavn, North Trondelag, Norway in 1896 to Ellis Island, New York. 

My Maternal Great Grandmother~~Gudrun Ivarra Lund~~Namsos, Lufthavn, Nord-Trondelag, Norway

Harry, Gladys, Gudrun (Lund) Linderman, baby Irene Linderman

Family history of Gudrun Ivara Lund Linderman, who married Edward Francis Linderman, resided at 705 W. Third Street, Dubuque, Iowa, 1908. Children: Harry William, Gladys Serena, Irene Mary, and Evelyn Frances Linderman

.Namsos_sjøhus, Norway

Norway

Namsos_from_Klompen_Norway

My Great Grandmother’s parents were John Theodor Lund and Georgine Johanne (Jansen) Lund of Domkirken, Bergen, Hordaland, Norway. They RESIDED AT FOSWINCHELSGADE 4, BERGEN, NORWAY for the 1900 Census. John and Georgine Lund had five children : Ragnhild, Elsiff, John, Solveig, and Gudrun Lund

hanseatic-wharf-bergen-Norway

Gudrun emigrated on 11 November 1896, at the age of 15. I cannot fathom how brave she must have been or maybe just how desperate she was. To board a ship and leave her homeland during the dead of winter. She must have been a very strong woman. I never got the privilege of knowing her, because she passed away years before I was born. Gudrun passed away after gall bladder surgery when a blood clot when to her brain. in those days they did not use stockings to protect against blood clots.

She emigrated as a servant to the Glenn W. Traer family in Hyde Park, Chicago, Illinois. My mother told me that she came as a governess. 

Gudrun married Edward Francis Linderman on 11 September 1902 in Winona, Minnesota

ELLIS ISLAND IN NEW YORK WAS OPENED IN 1892. GUDRON LUND WAS ONLY FIFTEEN YEARS OF AGE, WHEN SHE EMIGRATED FROM KRISTIANIA, KRISTIANIA, NORWAY, IN 1896,  TO ELLIS ISLAND, NEW YORK, ON THE SHIP “HEKLA”,  WITH CAPTAIN LAUB OF COPENHAGEN. THINGVALLA IS THE SHIPBUILDER. SHE CAME TO WORK AS A SERVANT FOR THE GLENN W. TRAER FAMILY IN HYDE PARK TOWN, CHICAGO, COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

Ellis Island, New York record:

First Name:Gudrun
Last Name:Lund
Ethnicity:Norway, Norwegian
Last Place of Residence:
Date of Arrival:Nov 11, 1896
Age at Arrival:  15y    Gender:  F    Marital Status:  S  
Ship of Travel: Hekla
Port of Departure: Christiania
Manifest Line Number:0102

http://library.thinkquest.org/20619/Eivirt.html#

Hyde Park, Chicago, Illinois

Norwegian Christmas Traditions

Family Dinners at Christmas

You’d think that Christmas dinner is either on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day, however, in a land where juletid is recognised from December to January (thanks to the Vikings), Christmas dinner is an everyday occurrence.

christmas-table

The most popular Christmas dinners, lutefiskpinnekjøttribbe, julepølser and medisterkaker, are eaten throughout the whole of mørketid (dark time).  Norwegians seem to love to announce the special occasion – ‘We’re having pinnekjøtt for dinner so I have to go home early‘ or ‘I can’t come to the movies… we’re having lutefisk‘.  It is perfectly normal in Norway to decline social invitations because of a Christmas dinner.

Sometimes Norwegians start juletid dinners even earlier.  We visited the farm in Alta for a long weekend in November and our dinners included pinnekjøtt and ribbe (and Grandiosa on the third night before the flight home).  To celebrate julour family doesn’t just meet on Christmas day, we have nearly a whole week of celebrations with a series of different traditional dinners.  Not only do we have dinners but we also have Christmas suppers.  Just for fun, below is our Christmas juletid menu from 2008:

dinner-plate

Frokost > BreakfastMiddag > Dinner, Kveldsmat > Supper
Because our family are farmers there is no ‘lunch’ as they are used to being out in the field working at this time – it is the only part of the day that has a bit of light.  Farfar says it’s the ‘best part of the day’ so why would you want to be sitting inside eating?  If you’re hungry, you’re always welcome to graze the kitchen table as Farmor always leaves food out, just in case.  Dinner can be as early as 2pm and supper as late as 11pm.  Every meal is a buffet (even breakfast).  No food is plated for you – it’s serve-yourself all-you-can-eat every day.  Farmor lays down a table full of food at every sitting – always more than everyone can eat.

December 22nd:
We arrive just in the afternoon in Alta.  Boller with salami and cheese with varm kakao (Hot Chocolate) is always waiting for us.

Middag – Norwegian Salmon with potatoes, cucumber salad, lemon and sour cream.

Kveldsmat – Fresh waffles with brown cheese or sour cream and jam, and varm kakao.

browncheese-waffles

December 23rd – Little Christmas Eve

Frokost – Bread with cold meats, cheeses and cucumber.  Waffles with brown cheese or sour cream and jam.  Breakfast juice.  Moose ate his ‘surf n’ turf‘:

caviar.jpg

Middag – Grandiosa pizza because we went out carolling.

Kveldsmat – Varm kakao and pastries/cookies

December 24th – Christmas Eve

Frokost – Bread with cold meats, cheeses and cucumber.  Bacon and eggs.  Pickled tomato herring (pickled uncooked herring in a tomatoes sauce with plenty of onion and spices – Mooses favourite breakfast!).  Breakfast juice and varm kakao.

pickled-tomatoe-herring

pickled-tom--herring-bite

Middag – Lutefisk and pinnekjøtt.  We normally have special farm guests at Christmas and so Farmor makes two dishes as Lutefisk is an acquired taste.  Each dish has its own particular sides:

Lutefisk – diced bacon, mushy peas, potatoes, grated brown cheese and mustard.  (The sides can be very regional.  Brown cheese and mustard is a North Norwegian tradition – Western Norway uses white sauce, East Norway uses a mustard sauce – and I’m sure there are plenty of other regional varieties.)

lutefisk-dinner

Pinnekjøtt – potatoes, mashed swede and mustard.  (Some make a thin gravy for the meat but Farmors is so juicy we don’t need it.)

Juleøl and julebrus (Christmas beer and soda).

Kveldsmat – too full from middag but we manage a piece or two of Kransekaker(Ring Cake).

December 25th – First Day of Christmas

Frokost – too full from last nights middag but manage to have some breakfast juice – needed to save ourselves for the day’s eating.

Middag – (Family dinner at Tantes) a buffet of cold cuts and Christmas leftovers.  Gløggjuleøl and julebrus.

Kveldsmat – Risgrøt (Rice Porridge) with the hidden almond and varm kakao.  (Storebror (big brother) always wins the mazipan pig because he eats the most grøt!)

christmas-grot

December 26th – Second Day of Christmas

Frokost – Bread with cold meats, cheeses and cucumber.  Breakfast juice.  (Food is starting to become a big blur but Farmor never gives up!)

Middag – Ribbe (Roast Pork Rib) with julepølse (Christmas Sausage), medisterkaker (White Rissoles), sauerkraut, gravy, pickled red cabbage, potatoes, prunes, cranberry/tyttebær sauce, mushy peas, apple sauce (specially made for me).  Moose’s plate:

trimmings

My Maternal Great Grandmother, Gudrun Ivara (Lund) Linderman

Deutsch: New York, New York, Ellis Island

Ellis Island - New York

Norwegian Christmas Christkindl

Norwegian Christmas Traditions and Food

Juletid (Christmas time) is a celebration of traditions and family in Norway. With the fall of winter snow and the wonderful displays of Northern Lights, Norwegians sit round their fire places, dance around the Christmas tree, enjoy rich food and share julefryd (Christmas cheer) with family, friends and in their communities. At this special time of year we are happy to share the Norwegian Christmas with you. We hope you will celebrate with us by having a little bit of Norway in your Christmas.

GUDRUN IVARA LUND LINDERMAN EMIGRATED IN 1896, TO ELLIS ISLAND, NEW YORK, NEW YORK AS A NANNY/GOVERNESS TO HYDE PARK TOWN, CHICAGO, COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 1900 CENSUS SHOWS GUDRUN WORKING FOR THE GLENN & IDA TRAER FAMILY.

ED CALLED HER GUD, AND SHE CALLED HIM EDDIE. THEY WERE VERY MUCH IN LOVE. AUNT GLADYS LINDERMAN NELSON, EPPIE LINDERMAN AYALA, AND ARTURO AYALA WENT TO NORWAY ON VACATION IN 1994, AND MET SOME OF OUR “LUND” RELATIVES RESIDING THERE. THE “LUND” SURNAME IS NORWEGIAN. THE NORWEGIANS USUALLY DERIVED THEIR NAMES FROM THE FAMILY FARM.

Harry, Gladys, Gudrun (Lund) Linderman, baby Irene LindermanGudrun (Lund) Linderman, Harry William Linderman, Dubuque, Iowa, 1922

Norwegian Christmas PlateNorwegian Christmas Tree

Norwegian Christmas Scene

Beautiful song about Norwegian flowers.

Hello World!

Bergen_Cathedral_Bergen_Hordaland_Norway (500x375)

This blog is about my Norwegian and Swedish roots.  My ancestors and descendants of my maternal great grandparents were John Theodor Lund and Georgine Johanne Jansen of Domkirken, Bergen, Hordaland, Norway.  

Marriage Record for them:

groom‘s name:John Theodor Lund

groom’s birth date:09 Oct 1842
groom’s birthplace:
groom’s age:
bride‘s name:Georgine Johanne Jansen
bride’s birth date:25 Oct 1837
bride’s birthplace:
bride’s age:

marriage date:21 Oct 1870

marriage place:Domkirken, Bergen, Hordaland, Norway

groom’s mother’s name:

bride’s father’s name:Helmik Janson
bride’s mother’s name:
groom’s race:
groom’s marital status:
groom’s previous wife’s name:
bride’s race:
bride’s marital status:
bride’s previous husband’s name:
indexing project (batch) number:M42937-8
system origin:Norway-VR

reference number:2:259V7VH
Citing this Record
“Norway, Marriages, 1660-1926,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NW3S-FHY : accessed 30 Nov 2012), John Theodor Lund and Georgine Johanne Jansen, 21 Oct 1870; citing Domkirken, Bergen, Hordaland, Norway, reference 2:259V7VH; FHL microfilm 278102.

English: Arboretum, Milde, Bergen, Hordaland, ...